Keeping MLK’s message alive

WLFI File Photo
WLFI File Photo

The Tippecanoe County Public Library held an annual service to honor the legacy of Dr. King. Over 100 people gathered to listen to speakers reflect on the how Doctor King is still impacting the world.

Keynote Speaker Richard Womack talked to the crowd about his experiences of racial inequality in the 1960s.
Later in the program, two African-American teens spoke about how Doctor King’s message is impacting the today’s youth.

Harrison High School Junior Courtland Keyes and his brother Colin said the racial divide in the U.S. is slowing closing.

“I’d say it’s a lot better. When you see the opportunities that everyone is given now, when it used to be a Caucasian only opportunity or disclusion. Now everybody is afforded that opportunity. I think that is what we see. It’s not 100 percent yet, but it will get there over tim if we keep working and following his dream,” Courtland Keyes said.

“I carry on his message by trying to encourage other people to do what they do.  Don’t try and hold back. Do what you do and something good will come out of it,” Colin Keyes said.

Both Keyes brothers said celebrating King’s birthday will enable his message of equality and justice to live on forever.

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