New detection technique could allow more effective Leukemia treatment

New technique could allow for more effective Leukemia treatment.
New technique could allow for more effective Leukemia treatment.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WLFI) – A new test method could help doctors more effectively treat people with Leukemia.

Researchers at Purdue have developed a way to detect the effectiveness of a drug on a Leukemia patient. The method uses a decoy to detect activity in a specific enzyme to see if a drug is working.

Normally, it takes doctors months to find out if a drug works on a patient. However, with this technique it would only take a few hours.

Assistant Professor Laurie Parker came up with the idea and said it could help kill cancer cells more quickly.

“It’s almost like antiboitic resistance. You set up this environment where there’s pressure on it from these drugs, that lets the strongest cancer cells survive. So, if you can knock them out right away, they don’t have a chance to do that,” said Parker.

The new method is being tested on 30 patients with Leukemia at IU Health in Indianapolis. If the tests go well, the technique will move to clinical trials.

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