Public Access Counselor’s ruling sends ‘chilling’ implications

Exponent photo editor Michael Takeda kneels where he said he was apprehended by Purdue and other local police agencies on Jan. 21, following the campus shooting. The location is near a door that is marked Room 237 in the Electrical Engineering Building. Purdue Police say Takeda was confronted on a different floor. (Photo Provided/The Exponent)
Exponent photo editor Michael Takeda kneels where he said he was apprehended by Purdue and other local police agencies on Jan. 21, following the campus shooting. The location is near a door that is marked Room 237 in the Electrical Engineering Building. Purdue Police say Takeda was confronted on a different floor. (Photo Provided/The Exponent)

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (The Exponent) – The decision by the state’s public access counselor to deny The Exponent’s request for access to videos showing Purdue police’s interaction with an Exponent photographer is disappointing, said Steve Badger, an attorney representing the paper.

“It basically allows authorities to shroud anything, virtually any law enforcement record in any way under the investigatory exception,” Badger said.

Indiana’s public access counselor, Luke Britt, made his ruling on a complaint filed by The Exponent with the University on Feb. 5 asking for the release of video footage of police interaction with Exponent photo editor Michael Takeda on Jan. 21, the day Andrew Boldt was murdered. Takeda was apprehended by police on the second floor of the Electrical Engineering building while on assignment, and some of his camera equipment was damaged.

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