Like father, like son: Kendall Stephens on learning the game

Photo Courtesy: Purdue Sports
Photo Courtesy: Purdue Sports

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WLFI) – Everette Stephens showed his son Kendall early on what it would take to become a Division I basketball player.

Last year as a freshman, Kendall Stephens averaged 8 points per game while shooting 37 percent from long distance. Numbers that led to him being named to the Big Ten All-Freshman Team.

The sophomore guard describes what it was like to learn the game from a 1,000-point scorer at Purdue.

“He taught really everything I need to know, really. From grade school when I would go out and work with him and him showing me how to shoot and workout on my own,” said Kendall Stephens.

The elder Stephens wasn’t known as a pure shooter, but Kendall gives much of the credit to his father.

“My dad was actually a pretty good shooter. I don’t think he gets enough credit for it, but he actually taught me a lot of mechanics and about the fundamentals of it,” said Stephens.

His 64 three-pointers were the second most by a Purdue freshman in school history — E’Twaun Moore holds the record at 66 set in 2008 — and he led all Big Ten freshman in triples made.

“I think by continuing to work on it I was able to get the skill down pretty well. I can still be a lot better, but I think I’ve come a long ways. He’s definitely had a big impact on my life especially as far as basketball goes,” said Stephens.

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