Hoosiers share their votes with ballot selfies

Taking a selfie has become a norm in today's culture. Now some voters have the urge to share their vote by taking a selfie with their ballot (WLFI).
Taking a selfie has become a norm in today's culture. Now some voters have the urge to share their vote by taking a selfie with their ballot (WLFI).

TIPPECANOE COUNTY, Ind. (WLFI) — Early voting is underway and some Hoosier voters want to share their votes by taking selfies with their ballots. In Indiana, you can feel free to pose for yourself at the polls, but elsewhere – it may be a crime.

Taking a selfie has become a norm in today’s culture, and voter Kylie Hanson said that’s why taking a selfie with her ballot was crucial.

“I’m totally into it,” she said.

She proudly took a selfie with her ballot after she was done voting Friday, and said she doesn’t see anything wrong with it.

“I don’t see why not,” said Hanson. “If people want to share who they are voting for and share what they’re doing and support going out and voting, then I think it should be legal.”

However, not all states feel that way.

In fact, a federal judge just declared Indiana’s “ballot selfie law” as unconstitutional and blocked enforcement on the ban.

Tippecanoe County Clerk Christa Coffey said the American Civil Liberties Union made it clear that it’s someone’s First Amendment right if they want to share their ballot with the public.

“The ACLU filed a lawsuit over that and based off of the decision of that lawsuit, ballot selfies are perfectly acceptable,” said Coffey.

Coffey said the reason for the controversy is because of possible political bribery.

“We don’t let a voter leave the precinct or the vote center with a piece of paper that says how they voted for compensation purposes,” said Coffey.

Just because they’re legal doesn’t mean everyone wants to jump on the selfie bandwagon.

“Personally, as a courtesy to people that are in the voting booths voting, I feel like it makes people uncomfortable if you’re taking pictures in there,” voter Charles Hockema said.

So watch out for even more election social media as more and more hit the polls.

“I have tons of friends always sharing their beliefs on social media and Facebook, Instagram and Twitter,” said Hanson. “I expect to see lots of selfies.”