Purdue professor takes an in-depth look into presidential politics

For a little perspective on the presidential campaigns and how they were waged, News 18 turned to Josh Scacco, an assistant professor in Purdue's Brian Lamb School of Communication. (WLFI Photo)
For a little perspective on the presidential campaigns and how they were waged, News 18 turned to Josh Scacco, an assistant professor in Purdue's Brian Lamb School of Communication. (WLFI Photo)

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WLFI) — For a little perspective on the presidential campaigns and how they were waged, News 18 turned to Josh Scacco, an assistant professor in Purdue’s Brian Lamb School of Communication.

Scacco said he’s relieved Election Day is finally here, and he’s not alone as most people are feeling the same way.

“Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have had diametrically opposed strategies in the last couple of days,” he said.

Clinton has had a team of well-known Democrats targeting areas where early voting numbers were low, such as Florida, Ohio and Nevada.

“Trump was at a break-neck pace traveling across the Battle Ground states, and there was no clear rhyme or reason for where he was targeting and why,” he said.

Scacco says Florida will be a key state to win and it’s going to be very close. He said the shared Latino vote is important, as well as the percentage of women voting compared to men.

“We know that based on later polls that both of those groups tend to lead toward Secretary Clinton,” Scacco said.

He continued, “Right now, turnout is sky high. It’s already beaten 2012 in terms of its levels, and it’s rapidly approaching 2008 in terms of its turnout.”

The 2016 Election will forever change presidential politics moving forward. Watch the full interview from News 18 at Five to hear Scacco’s views on what changes he thinks we will see in the future.